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Queensland researchers to create world's first 3D-printed prosthetic ear – 9news.com.au


September 18, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ 3D Printed Articles


Researchers in Queensland are crowdfunding a project to 3D print the world’s first living prosthetic ear.

The biomedical breakthrough is hoped to change the lives of those with microtia, a condition where the external part of the ear does not fully develop.

Microtia affects one in 12,000 children and treatment can be costly and inaccessible.

Angelika Walton, whose son Ole was born missing an ear, told 9NEWS she had to fundraise $150,000 for surgery in the US.

It is hoped 3D printed prosthetic ears, cultured from the patient’s own cells, will be a more affordable and accessible means of treatment.

Queensland University of Technology Associate Professor Mia Woodruff said due to lack of government funding, researchers have turned to crowdfunding to make the project a reality.

“We have the people, we have the resources. We just don’t have the research funds to be able to do that project,” she said.

The next stage of the project will involve the prosthetic ear being implanted by a surgeon.

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Researchers in Queensland are crowdfunding a project to 3D print the world’s first living prosthetic ear.

The biomedical breakthrough is hoped to change the lives of those with microtia, a condition where the external part of the ear does not fully develop.

Microtia affects one in 12,000 children and treatment can be costly and inaccessible.

Angelika Walton, whose son Ole was born missing an ear, told 9NEWS she had to fundraise $150,000 for surgery in the US.

It is hoped 3D printed prosthetic ears, cultured from the patient’s own cells, will be a more affordable and accessible means of treatment.

Queensland University of Technology Associate Professor Mia Woodruff said due to lack of government funding, researchers have turned to crowdfunding to make the project a reality.

“We have the people, we have the resources. We just don’t have the research funds to be able to do that project,” she said.

The next stage of the project will involve the prosthetic ear being implanted by a surgeon.

© Nine Digital Pty Ltd 2016

Send your photos, videos and stories to 9NEWS

onlinenews@nine.com.au
Large files
9news.wetransfer.com

You can remain anonymous. Click here for more information.

Property news: The upfront costs first home buyers face – realestate.com.au

Career news: Not looking for work? You’ll still get further with a SEEK profile – seek.com.au

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